Monday 06th December

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Rhys James: Wiseboy review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer

A sharply written tongue-in-cheek take on white privilege from the young master of pithy comedy.

Anyone following Rhys James on Twitter will attest that few comedians package their observational comedy quite so pithily.  While some complain how social media’s devalued the profession, opening the door for the world and its dog to dabble in satire, the Mock The Week occasional uses it to hone his retorts on big news items and day-to-day occurrences – essential panel show practice.  These skills translate to his live material, with 2016 show Forgives being one the tightest-written around.  And in Wiseboy, the son of Harpenden delivers another densely-packed show ironically bemoaning his comfortable, privileged existence.

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Category: Comedy
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Rhys James: “Who wants to hear the political opinions of a 25-year-old who’s never experienced anything?”

Tomorrow night, Rhys James brings his latest show – Forgives – to Soho Theatre for five nights.  The young stand-up, labelled ‘one to watch’ for a while and now featuring regularly on comedy vehicles like Mock The Week, delivers an impressive show full of great jokes, call-backs and over-privileged angst.  Ahead of the Soho run, Ian Cater caught up with him to discuss Russell Brand, poetry and raccoons.

Rhys James is unexpectedly enjoyable to interview.  At least as funny as he seems on-stage, he’s also relaxed, open and self-aware.  In short, a little different to the young man I saw performing Forgives at the Edinburgh Fringe last year.

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Category: Comedy
© Matt Crockett
© Matt Crockett

Rhys James: Forgives review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer

James delivers a very impressively written show full of great jokes, call-backs and over-privileged angst.

Rhys James’ show is a well-crafted hour of entertainment, setting forth his views on the world as a 90s kid and self-confessed ‘prankster’.  Forgives refers to the fact that although his generation seems perpetually angry, his only struggles are to get by as a young, middle class, white, straight male and to master modern technology.

James knows what makes an audience tick.  He keeps his stories short and punchlines snappy.  He varies his jokes, directing plenty his own way – including one in which a “stupid, dumb parrot” reveals his girlfriend’s infidelity, and a later contention that “I’m not as vegan as I look”.

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Category: Comedy