Thursday 15th November

Advertise | Login  RSS  |  Twitter  |  Facebook

KaosHero

The KAOS Brief review: Blair Witch meets Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Rating:

Last week saw the European premiere of new sci-fi thriller The KAOS Brief at Stratford Picture House as part of this year’s ‘London International Festival of Science Fiction and Fantastic Film’, a.k.a. Sci-Fi-London 17.  

Cora Robertson attended the screening and Q&A session for What’s On London, and was full of praise for JP Mandarino’s first feature film – “a really enjoyable romp through a host of sci-fi and horror tropes” – which manages to fuse the best aspects of The Blair Witch Project with Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

Continue reading »

Category: Cinema
1

Nick Moran: “I look back with fondness at the fact I was sort of ‘prince of my era’. I rang the nuts out of it and couldn’t have had more fun.”

Nick Moran was once one of the leading lights of the British film industry.  After nailing the lead role in Guy Ritchie’s cult classic Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels in 1997, he had the world – and its myriad pleasures – at his feet.  In the following years, his work was a mixed bag, with solid turns in the likes of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows being offset by sloppier movements in Soccer Dog: European Cup.

But Moran’s now making impressive strides as a film director and returns to the big screen today in Caradog James’ new horror-thriller Don’t Knock Twice.  Ahead of the film’s release, Moran spoke to Ian Cater about filmmaking, the ‘un-bankable’ Casey Affleck and partying with Hugh Hefner.

Don’t Knock Twice, released today, is a promising supernatural thriller from the team behind acclaimed sci-fi drama The Machine.  It tells the story of a mother (Katee Sackhoff) trying to rebuild a relationship with her estranged daughter (Lucy Boynton), who awoke the spirit of a demonic witch.  Amidst familial tension and terrifying goings on, Nick Moran makes a welcome appearance as Detective Boardman, investigating the daughter’s disappearance.  But if Moran is forced to play second fiddle in the film, his ardour for its final form comes through loud and clear.

Continue reading »

Category: Cinema
Horrorland
Horrorland

Goosebumps Alive! at The Vaults, Waterloo

Rating:

By Shannon Rawlins

Most 90s kids are familiar with RL Stine’s Goosebumps collection – a series of books designed to scare the life out of anyone under the age of 14 with an overactive imagination.  With this in mind, I was extremely excited to hear that Waterloo’s The Vaults have created Goosebumps Alive! – an immersive theatre show based on the haunting tales from my childhood.  And even the recent film adaptation starring Jack Black hadn’t put me off, so I went along to the press launch with high hopes.

Continue reading »

Category: Theatre
Ghost Stories at the Arts Theatre
Ghost Stories at the Arts Theatre

Ghost Stories: It’s only a show … it’s only a show … it’s only London’s scariest theatre show

Rating:

If Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman’s Ghost Stories prove anything, it is that paranormal phenomena do exist. Hidden away in the Arts Theatre, Ghost Stories will have your pulse racing as your mind is tricked into fearing the unknown dangers that lurk in the dark. Ghost Stories has it all- laughs, scares, jumps, and for those who are easily terrified, a few nightmares. If ever there was a theatre show that is able to seamlessly intertwine horror with tales of supernatural goings-on then Ghost Stories leads the way.

Continue reading »

Category: Theatre
The Woman in Black at the Fortune Theatre
The Woman in Black at the Fortune Theatre

The Woman in Black: A reign of terror in the dark

Rating:

The Woman in Black at the Fortune Theatre is a unanimously acclaimed theatre production, and from experiencing it, it’s pretty obvious why. If someone was to tell you, that a two-man on-stage theatre production would have you jumping out of your seat, and transport the audience to a terrifyingly ghostly world, you would not quite believe them, would you? But, The Woman in Black achieves exactly that effect, as it combines live theatre-production, with ominous cinematic effects to achieve a mesmerizingly terrifying theatrical experience.

Continue reading »

Category: Theatre
Afraid of the Dark (Charing Cross Theatre)
Afraid of the Dark (Charing Cross Theatre)

Afraid of the Dark: Not the fright of your life, but still a good scare

Rating:

What scares you the most when the lights go out? Afraid of the Dark promises to paralyse the audience with fear. Everyone is afraid of something, and this production hopes to exploit that very fear. But for all the promotional hype of a terrorising play, Afraid of the Dark, just falls short of the mark.

The plot of the production centres on the character of Henry Charlier, a vaudeville performer known as ‘the master of terror.’ By the 1950s Charlier’s shows are in decline, as audiences are more interested in motion pictures than live theatre. But one day when Charlier turns up at the offices of a B-movie studio, apparently to play the part in a movie that was subsequently shut down due to budget-cuts; it appears that he might be the ailing studio’s unlikely sinister saviour.

Continue reading »

Category: Theatre