Monday 06th December

Advertise | Login  RSS  |  Twitter  |  Facebook

WOL Comedy Awards

What’s On London Comedy Awards 2016

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer

Now the sun has firmly set on this year’s season of comedy festivals, it’s time for What’s On London to announce our 2016 Comedy Award Winners and alert you to where you can catch these acts over the next couple of months.  

The field is stronger than ever before.  Londoners are privileged to have such a talented generation of performers available to entertain them across the city on each and every night of the week, in every conceivable style.  Whether you’re after stand-up, music, sketches, improv or something else entirely, the list of winners below contains something for everyone.

So follow our advice: make this the season of good cheer, book some tickets, get out of the house and keep yourself warm with the roar of laughter.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
kkkk

The Free Association: Jacuzzi review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer

The Free Association deliver an impressive and entertaining show, which occasionally varies in comedic output but never in speed of thought.

For those who grew up watching Whose Line Is It Anyway, quick-fire improvised comedy will always have a place in our hearts.  And The Free Association – some of London’s best teachers and performers of the art – are excellently-placed to deliver it.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
©Richard-Davenport

Austentatious: An Improvised Jane Austen Novel review

Rating:

Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer

Austentatious perform the very best improvised comedy, blowing the audience away with their talent, timing and interaction.  Even those who hate Austen can love this.

I’d like to start with a confession: I didn’t think I’d massively enjoy watching Austentatious.  That’s despite the mountain of top-marks and awards the troupe has earned.  Despite liking all of its cast members from first-hand experience or by reputation.  And despite appreciating that Austen provides a good backdrop for improvised comedy (as Daniel Nils Roberts explained to me).

The problem was that I hated reading Pride and Prejudice at school and always found the Regency era a bit … well, twee.  So it’s even more impressive that the performers completely won me round, turning in one of the funniest and most watchable shows of the Fringe.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
Austentatious Publicity Image

Austentatious: An Improvised Jane Austen Novel, Edinburgh Preview

In our sixth Edinburgh Fringe preview, Ian Cater speaks to Daniel Nils Roberts of the Austentatious improvised comedy troupe about their award-winning show, chastity, trust, blasphemy and yoghurt.  Austentatious are performing their unique brand of period comedy – based on an original, and often whimsical, Jane Austen title suggested by the audience – at Udderbelly each day until 21st August. 

Most performers I’ve spoken to in the build-up to the Fringe express similar emotions: relief that the phoney war is nearly over and a panicky wish to squirrel themselves away for more revision before an all-important exam.  But from a growing number of improvised comedians, there’s a different vibe: one of calm contentment, stemming from inborn confidence, acting acumen and experience.

Daniel Nils Roberts knows more than most about the world of ‘improv’.  After graduating from the legendary Oxford Imps collective – a La Masia for churning out talented, spontaneous performers such as Ivo Graham and Rachel Parris – he’s starred in a number of improv groups including Racing Minds and Impromptu Shakespeare.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy
The Noise Next Door: The Noise Are Back In Town.

The Noise Next Door. Soho Theatre.

Rating:

Making things up is easy. Look, spludgefunkle. I just made up a word. The word, in case you missed it, is spludgefunkle.

  1. What does spludgefunkle mean?
  2. How do you pronounce spludgefunkle?
  3. Use spludgefunkle in a sentence.

 

  1. It’s funny and therefore it doesn’t necessarily need to mean anything.
  2. You can pronounce it however you want to pronounce it.
  3. This review is complete and utter spludgefunkle.

The point I’m trying to make, in a rather roundabout way, is that making things up can be fun. I guess what I’m also trying to say is that improvisation should be celebrated because, and not despite, of its total disregard for cohesion and logic. “Improv-comedy” is silly, and silly is good. A world without silliness is a world not worth living in.

Continue reading »

Category: Comedy