Saturday 27th May

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Jonathan Pie: Live review

Rating:

Tom Walker‘s ranty yet astute live show as comedy creation Jonathan Pie will be available to buy on his website from Monday next week.  Ian Cater attended the recorded performance at The O2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire on 3rd March 2017, and reports below on Walker’s brilliant delivery and ‘rare ability to spew out persuasive points amongst the bile’.

Tom Walker’s weekly videos as alter ego Jonathan Pie are as close as we currently get in this country to The Daily Show or Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.  Or perhaps The Late Show with Steven Colbert is a better comparison, given Walker uses his fictional creation – a television news reporter who rants acerbic views at his producer during out-takes – to make important arguments about politics, the media and society in general.

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Category: Comedy
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Erich McElroy: (US) Electile Dysfunction review

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Ian Cater, Chief Features Writer

Don’t miss a hilarious and insightful analysis of the state of American politics by a natural and intelligent entertainer.

So many shows at this year’s Fringe cover Brexit or depression, that it’s refreshing to get a little light relief with a witty analysis of the flawed individual who’ll soon run The Free World.  And there’s none better to provide it than Erich McElroy, an immensely likeable US stand-up who’s lived in the UK for 16 years.  Because he gets what we don’t understand about America, explains it simply and humorously, and – importantly, given the range of ages in the crowd – puts it in historical context.

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Category: Comedy
Handbagged at Vaudeville
Handbagged at Vaudeville

Handbagged: Afternoon tea with a difference

Rating:

Born just six months apart, one destined to rule as monarch, the other destined to lead as Prime Minister; Handbagged is an entertaining offering of their somewhat tepid relationship. Handbagged, though based on speculation, presents a unique insight into the private weekly meetings between these two icons. In a stroke of genius writer Moria Buffini doubles up the central characters, so you are given both old and young incarnations. The older and younger Queen, are respectively known as Q (Marion Bailey) and Liz (Lucy Robinson). Similarly, you are given an older and younger Margaret Thatcher known as, T (Stella Gonet) and Mags (Fenella Woolgar).

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Category: Theatre