Monday 19th November

Advertise | Login  RSS  |  Twitter  |  Facebook

1

Nick Moran: “I look back with fondness at the fact I was sort of ‘prince of my era’. I rang the nuts out of it and couldn’t have had more fun.”

Nick Moran was once one of the leading lights of the British film industry.  After nailing the lead role in Guy Ritchie’s cult classic Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels in 1997, he had the world – and its myriad pleasures – at his feet.  In the following years, his work was a mixed bag, with solid turns in the likes of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows being offset by sloppier movements in Soccer Dog: European Cup.

But Moran’s now making impressive strides as a film director and returns to the big screen today in Caradog James’ new horror-thriller Don’t Knock Twice.  Ahead of the film’s release, Moran spoke to Ian Cater about filmmaking, the ‘un-bankable’ Casey Affleck and partying with Hugh Hefner.

Don’t Knock Twice, released today, is a promising supernatural thriller from the team behind acclaimed sci-fi drama The Machine.  It tells the story of a mother (Katee Sackhoff) trying to rebuild a relationship with her estranged daughter (Lucy Boynton), who awoke the spirit of a demonic witch.  Amidst familial tension and terrifying goings on, Nick Moran makes a welcome appearance as Detective Boardman, investigating the daughter’s disappearance.  But if Moran is forced to play second fiddle in the film, his ardour for its final form comes through loud and clear.

Continue reading »

Category: Cinema
Daniel Betts and Kelly Hotten
Daniel Betts and Kelly Hotten

Dial M for Murder @ Richmond Theatre

Rating:

You may think that taking on a legendary film maker and a major if not quite a landmark moment in cinema would make any theatre director wary. Not Lisa Bailey. Though what we’re left with is a shadow of the movie. Remarkable, when the play is billed with the Hitchcock suffix and this is not the film version as adapted by its playwright Frederick Knott. Nothing to do with Hitchcock, though we can see why he was so drawn.

Continue reading »

Category: Culture
Sofia Hagen
Sofia Hagen

Independent Spook Flick: Inside Shadows

Rating:

insideshadows.com // SchnitzelMonster

All arty angles on the mundane accoutrements of urban life, I very much enjoyed Londoner Chris Silver’s Vauxhall-based low-budget chiller ‘Inside Shadows’. Coupled with a hauntingly jangly soundtrack by John Harris, acoustic instruments blending with real-world sounds, it instantly captures that eerie essence of home-alone-ness. Although nothing much happens during the first half it does prove immersive, a little like those infant episodes of ‘Big Brother’. Are the actors playing themselves? Is it scripted or improvised? Who cares, if it works. Seventy minutes is the ideal length for an independent production, as for many other movies I should say. The film tends to abstraction, a continual cinematic survey, perfectly-paced to effect an intimate and nervy atmosphere. At points I wanted to drain the colour, it could certainly take a monochrome ‘print’.

Continue reading »

Category: Cinema
Thriller Show
©Irina Chira/Sarynafoto

Thriller Live Review

Michael Jackson is a name that is synonymous with entertainment, so it is not surprising that any production linked to his name would prove to be entertaining. Thriller Live takes the audience through a two-hour tribute, journeying through the musical evolution of Jackson, from his humble days as a member of Jackson 5, to eventual global superstardom.

It is clear from the beginning of the show that Thriller Live will be a tribute show, lacking a true narrative and focusing entirely on the music. However, this does not devalue the entertainment appeal of the show. While the use of a sycophantic narrator presenting the story of Jackson’s musical achievements reminds the audience of an episode of “This is your life”, and the audience interaction can lean towards the side of awkward, it clearly reflects the aim of the show; to celebrate the music of Michael Jackson, not to address Jackson’s personal life.

Continue reading »

Category: Dance